featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
This one was either way easy or way hard -- the correct answer to the question about Terry Pratchett's second short story was "Night Dweller", a story about a suicide mission to combat Unnamed Horror. It was reputedly not at all funny and possibly the worst thing Mr. Pratchett has ever written.

Nonetheless, it was pretty obvious to most of you, gaining a point for [livejournal.com profile] fionnabhar, [livejournal.com profile] bountifulpots, [livejournal.com profile] theslice, [livejournal.com profile] starrthinks, [livejournal.com profile] zianuray, [livejournal.com profile] lexpendragon, [livejournal.com profile] rfunk, [livejournal.com profile] matchgirl42, and [livejournal.com profile] grmrefr.

Otherwise, the king of the round was [livejournal.com profile] agrnmn, who picked up 4 points for "The Quicker Vicar". Also, [livejournal.com profile] bountifulpots got 2 points for "Brewer's Millions", and [livejournal.com profile] triadruid and [livejournal.com profile] rfunk got a point each, for "Brewer's Thousands" and "Johnny and the Carpet People", respectively.

Other business of note -- this is the last of the public Balderdash posts. I have added everybody who has played and everybody who requested access to a Balderdash filter, which will now be where these posts go. If you haven't yet played, and didn't respond to my filters poll, and you want to be able to see future Balderdash posts, please let me know and I will add you.

Other than that, Point standings are below the cut )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
This one was either way easy or way hard -- the correct answer to the question about Terry Pratchett's second short story was "Night Dweller", a story about a suicide mission to combat Unnamed Horror. It was reputedly not at all funny and possibly the worst thing Mr. Pratchett has ever written.

Nonetheless, it was pretty obvious to most of you, gaining a point for [livejournal.com profile] fionnabhar, [livejournal.com profile] bountifulpots, [livejournal.com profile] theslice, [livejournal.com profile] starrthinks, [livejournal.com profile] zianuray, [livejournal.com profile] lexpendragon, [livejournal.com profile] rfunk, [livejournal.com profile] matchgirl42, and [livejournal.com profile] grmrefr.

Otherwise, the king of the round was [livejournal.com profile] agrnmn, who picked up 4 points for "The Quicker Vicar". Also, [livejournal.com profile] bountifulpots got 2 points for "Brewer's Millions", and [livejournal.com profile] triadruid and [livejournal.com profile] rfunk got a point each, for "Brewer's Thousands" and "Johnny and the Carpet People", respectively.

Other business of note -- this is the last of the public Balderdash posts. I have added everybody who has played and everybody who requested access to a Balderdash filter, which will now be where these posts go. If you haven't yet played, and didn't respond to my filters poll, and you want to be able to see future Balderdash posts, please let me know and I will add you.

Other than that, Point standings are below the cut )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
The Question: In 1965, Terry Pratchett was 16. He published his second short story this year, which contained the line "Brewer has taken to praying a lot. I think he was a fool to volunteer for this trip, but I suppose I can see his reasons.". What was the name of this short story, and what was it about?

The Answers: are below the cut. There is a correct answer among this flock of creative submissions, and voting for it earns you one point. Each vote an incorrect answer gets earns its author one point. Please not to be voting for the answer you submitted - no points for that!
Onward and er... upward? )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
The Question: In 1965, Terry Pratchett was 16. He published his second short story this year, which contained the line "Brewer has taken to praying a lot. I think he was a fool to volunteer for this trip, but I suppose I can see his reasons.". What was the name of this short story, and what was it about?

The Answers: are below the cut. There is a correct answer among this flock of creative submissions, and voting for it earns you one point. Each vote an incorrect answer gets earns its author one point. Please not to be voting for the answer you submitted - no points for that!
Onward and er... upward? )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
I posted this on Thursday, but didn't get enough responses to make continuing the round worth the effort, so I figured I'd repost it and give the players another day to respond. The question is:

In 1965, Terry Pratchett was 16. He published his second short story this year, which contained the line "Brewer has taken to praying a lot. I think he was a fool to volunteer for this trip, but I suppose I can see his reasons.". What was the name of this short story, and what was it about?

Iff'n you want to play, please respond within the next 24 hours or so. Answers are screened and the usual stuff applies.
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
I posted this on Thursday, but didn't get enough responses to make continuing the round worth the effort, so I figured I'd repost it and give the players another day to respond. The question is:

In 1965, Terry Pratchett was 16. He published his second short story this year, which contained the line "Brewer has taken to praying a lot. I think he was a fool to volunteer for this trip, but I suppose I can see his reasons.". What was the name of this short story, and what was it about?

Iff'n you want to play, please respond within the next 24 hours or so. Answers are screened and the usual stuff applies.
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Mona Ogg)
It's Glorious Discworld Fanwank Day, and I got my lilac underpants on and everything. So, here's the question for this round:

In 1965, Terry Pratchett was 16. He published his second short story this year, which contained the line "Brewer has taken to praying a lot. I think he was a fool to volunteer for this trip, but I suppose I can see his reasons.". What was the name of this short story, and what was it about?

Answers are screened, please submit by Tuesday morning.
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
It's Glorious Discworld Fanwank Day, and I got my lilac underpants on and everything. So, here's the question for this round:

In 1965, Terry Pratchett was 16. He published his second short story this year, which contained the line "Brewer has taken to praying a lot. I think he was a fool to volunteer for this trip, but I suppose I can see his reasons.". What was the name of this short story, and what was it about?

Answers are screened, please submit by Tuesday morning.
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


Can't seem to post an entry long enough to do the wrap-up for last round. Have tried 23 times, exactly. Perhaps two-line entry will work, and I can post the results later?

EDIT: Comments work, entries don't. Results of this round are in the comments to this post, so clicky, eh?
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


Can't seem to post an entry long enough to do the wrap-up for last round. Have tried 23 times, exactly. Perhaps two-line entry will work, and I can post the results later?

EDIT: Comments work, entries don't. Results of this round are in the comments to this post, so clicky, eh?
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
Who is that masked man?


The answers are in, choose which one you think is correct. There is indeed a correct answer within the mounds of steaming monkey poop served up below the cut, choose it, and a point shall be yours. Since I didn't get to putting this up this morning, the deadline for voting shall be Friday morning. Oh yeah, don't vote for your answer, yo.
Variations on a Theme )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
Who is that masked man?


The answers are in, choose which one you think is correct. There is indeed a correct answer within the mounds of steaming monkey poop served up below the cut, choose it, and a point shall be yours. Since I didn't get to putting this up this morning, the deadline for voting shall be Friday morning. Oh yeah, don't vote for your answer, yo.
Variations on a Theme )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (moondragon)


Take a look at the roguish fellow above, and tell me, bold Balderdashers, who is this comic-book supervillain, what are his powers, and where did he come from?

RULES: This is the part where you make shit up. Answers are screened. Answers will be accepted until 9 a.m. tomorrow.

EDIT: If you know the right answer, you'll have a chance to get points for it when we vote. No points for submitting the right answer now, but I am impressed if you can. :)
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


Take a look at the roguish fellow above, and tell me, bold Balderdashers, who is this comic-book supervillain, what are his powers, and where did he come from?

RULES: This is the part where you make shit up. Answers are screened. Answers will be accepted until 9 a.m. tomorrow.

EDIT: If you know the right answer, you'll have a chance to get points for it when we vote. No points for submitting the right answer now, but I am impressed if you can. :)
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


Votes are in, votes are counted. Regrettably, the proper answer to this one is this wretchedly impenetrable chunk of meaningless artspeak:
"The painting is "Vertical Horizon" by Colin Harbut. Harbut says about his work: "My latest paintings are an exploration into the boundaries between abstraction and figuration. While I admire the intuitive process of abstract painting, I investigate the communicative possibilities of the oil medium through color, form, and texture. In this approach I search for unique, non-cliché method to discuss the human condition from a completely innovative, non-representational perspective.""

Both [livejournal.com profile] ceruleanst and [livejournal.com profile] kittenpants (being artists) knew that this is the sort of self-important crap you have to come up with to sell a painting, so they get a point each.

In the voting, [livejournal.com profile] kittenpants produced a creditable chunk of artspeak herself, and fooled 5 of you, gaining 5 points for the tragic tale of Ivan Vrubel. [livejournal.com profile] jackbabalon23 picked up three votes for Klimt's encounter with mass human sacrifice. [livejournal.com profile] fionnabhar convinced two people it was a Chagall, for 2 points. Coming in at one vote apiece were [livejournal.com profile] triadruid, who called it a Sycamore at Sunset, [livejournal.com profile] diermuid's bluegreen man of Atlantis, [livejournal.com profile] wildnsquirrelly's story of Earnest Rowe, driven mad by Dungeons and Dragons, and [livejournal.com profile] 8elements' attribution of scratch-off crayon painting to Andy Warhol. [livejournal.com profile] karinablack voted for her own answer, and gets no points, just a sound implied thrashing :-P

Current point totals:Read more... )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


Votes are in, votes are counted. Regrettably, the proper answer to this one is this wretchedly impenetrable chunk of meaningless artspeak:
"The painting is "Vertical Horizon" by Colin Harbut. Harbut says about his work: "My latest paintings are an exploration into the boundaries between abstraction and figuration. While I admire the intuitive process of abstract painting, I investigate the communicative possibilities of the oil medium through color, form, and texture. In this approach I search for unique, non-cliché method to discuss the human condition from a completely innovative, non-representational perspective.""

Both [livejournal.com profile] ceruleanst and [livejournal.com profile] kittenpants (being artists) knew that this is the sort of self-important crap you have to come up with to sell a painting, so they get a point each.

In the voting, [livejournal.com profile] kittenpants produced a creditable chunk of artspeak herself, and fooled 5 of you, gaining 5 points for the tragic tale of Ivan Vrubel. [livejournal.com profile] jackbabalon23 picked up three votes for Klimt's encounter with mass human sacrifice. [livejournal.com profile] fionnabhar convinced two people it was a Chagall, for 2 points. Coming in at one vote apiece were [livejournal.com profile] triadruid, who called it a Sycamore at Sunset, [livejournal.com profile] diermuid's bluegreen man of Atlantis, [livejournal.com profile] wildnsquirrelly's story of Earnest Rowe, driven mad by Dungeons and Dragons, and [livejournal.com profile] 8elements' attribution of scratch-off crayon painting to Andy Warhol. [livejournal.com profile] karinablack voted for her own answer, and gets no points, just a sound implied thrashing :-P

Current point totals:Read more... )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


The answers are in -- please vote by commenting with your choice. There is a correct answer hidden among the BS answers in this round, and choosing it earns you one point. Please vote before Monday at 9 a.m. to be counted.

I think this is the best group of answers yet -- well done, y'all.

(NOTE: A couple of these are edited slightly from the original submission. Some people responded as if they were speaking directly to me, so I pulled out the personal notes.)

The Lucky 13 - Maybe numerological significance *does* grow on trees. )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)


The answers are in -- please vote by commenting with your choice. There is a correct answer hidden among the BS answers in this round, and choosing it earns you one point. Please vote before Monday at 9 a.m. to be counted.

I think this is the best group of answers yet -- well done, y'all.

(NOTE: A couple of these are edited slightly from the original submission. Some people responded as if they were speaking directly to me, so I pulled out the personal notes.)

The Lucky 13 - Maybe numerological significance *does* grow on trees. )
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (did you have fun?)
I need something to distract me from strife at the office, otherwise, I may kill and eat my assistant. So! It's time for another fun-filled round of LJ-Balderdash. This is the art appreciation round -- please look at the painting below, and tell us its title and artist. (You can click the picture for a larger version.) Once again, this is the part where you make stuff up. Answers will be screened, and you have until 9 a.m. tomorrow to respond.


Also, I have a side bet on with myself that I know what [livejournal.com profile] jackbabalon23 will say in this round... Let's see if I'm right, shall we?
EDIT: I was wrong, but not far wrong.
featherynscale: Schmendrick the magician from The Last Unicorn (Default)
I need something to distract me from strife at the office, otherwise, I may kill and eat my assistant. So! It's time for another fun-filled round of LJ-Balderdash. This is the art appreciation round -- please look at the painting below, and tell us its title and artist. (You can click the picture for a larger version.) Once again, this is the part where you make stuff up. Answers will be screened, and you have until 9 a.m. tomorrow to respond.


Also, I have a side bet on with myself that I know what [livejournal.com profile] jackbabalon23 will say in this round... Let's see if I'm right, shall we?
EDIT: I was wrong, but not far wrong.

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